These practical & elegant crafts would make the perfect gift while everyone is spending more time at home, or something beautiful for yourself to enjoy using everyday.

Lockdown has led to copious amounts of baking, endless cups of tea, and time gathered around the table with your household, discussing the crazy world we live in right now. One upside is it has led to an appreciation for belongings that have both form and function, as we all try to declutter, choose sustainably and support Irish. Here are some pieces from talented Irish makers that you will treasure with every use.

Arran Street East

Irish Made Awards overall winners Arran Street East make beautiful hand-thrown ceramics in a range of colours. Each piece is rigorously designed and tested to enahnce the experience of eating and drinking.

Mug, Arran Street East (€36)
Breakfast bowl, Arran Street East (€36)

Nicholas Mosse

Nicholas Mosse pottery is made by Nick, his wife Susan and a team of potters in Co Kilkenny. Nick makes a range of traditional Irish spongecraft pottery, and Susan, a botanical artist, makes each pattern.

Forget Me Not teapot, Nicholas Mosse (€97)

Fred O’Mahony Woodturning

Fred has spent the last 25 years making with the medium of wood. Originally from Waterford, his workshop overlooks the River Suir, and each piece is inspired by the natural beauty of the wood.

Spalted beech bowl, Fred O’Mahony (€165)

karoArt

karoArt is a small ceramic studio based in Dublin. Karo’s pieces are inspired by fables, myths and imaginary worlds. She shares her studio and shop in Harold’s Cross with Grainne the granny grehound and Leeloo the collie.

Milk jug, karoArt (€35)

Dunbeacon Pottery

Helen Ennis handmakes elegant ceramic homewares in West Cork. Her workshop is based along the Wild Atlantic Way, and before lockdown, was open to the public most days.

Butter dish, Dunbeacon Pottery (€30)

Ballyshane Irish Wood Design

Based at Duckett’s Grove Estate in Carlow, William and his wife Cheryl created Ballyshane. With a passion for woodturning, William works primarily with native Irish hardwoods, with a fondness for Irish beech.

Board, Ballyshane Irish Wood Design (€25)

Emblem Weavers

Irish linen is naturally durable, absorbent and stain resistant. This piece is woven and made in Wexford.

Emblem Weavers linen tea towel, Irish Design Shop (€18)

Saturday Workshop

Father and daughter duo Edward and Iseult O’Clery make wooden products from locally sourced hardwoods. Using their combined skills in furniture making, boat building and architecture, they have created a range of simple traditional objects and toys.

Egg cups, Saturday workshop (€28)

Jerpoint Glass

Jerpoint Glass is located in the rural vilage of Stonyford, Co Kilkenny. Keith and Kathleen Leadbetter established the studio in 1979, combining their glass blowing and artistic talents.

Jug, Jerpoint Glass (€42.95)

Slated

Husband and wife team Ed and Tara Hammond create slate pieces for the home in Dublin. Each piece is unique due to the natural integrity of the stone.

Coasters, Slated (€30)

Bearded Man Ireland

Conor Cogan crafts wooden accessories in his workshop in Navan, Co Meath, using traditional methods. As well as kitchen tools, he makes men’s shaving accessories too.

Pizza cutting bar, Bearded Man Ireland (€23)

Matt Jones

Matt uses ethically sourced Irish wood such as fallen beech, walnut, ash and oak trees to make his collection of handmade salad bowls, salt mills and pepper grinders. He is based in Riverstown, Co Sligo.

6 inch salt and pepper grinders, Matt Jones (€120)